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Pomodori al Forno

Pomodori al Forno


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Ingredients

  • 1 cups (or more) olive oil, divided
  • 2 pounds plum tomatoes, halved lengthwise, seeded
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons dried oregano
  • 1 to 2 garlic cloves, minced
  • 2 teaspoons minced fresh Italian parsley
  • Aged goat cheese (such as Bûcheron)
  • 1 baguette, thinly sliced crosswise, toasted

Recipe Preparation

  • Preheat oven to 250°F. Pour 1/2 cup oil into 13x9x2-inch glass or ceramic baking dish. Arrange tomatoes in dish, cut side up. Drizzle with remaining 1/2 cup oil. Sprinkle with oregano, sugar, and salt. Bake 1 hour. Using tongs, turn tomatoes over. Bake 1 hour longer. Turn tomatoes over again. Bake until deep red and very tender, transferring tomatoes to plate when soft (time will vary, depending on ripeness of tomatoes), about 15 to 45 minutes longer.

  • Layer tomatoes in medium bowl, sprinkling garlic and parsley over each layer; reserve oil in baking dish. Drizzle tomatoes with reserved oil, adding more if necessary to cover. Let stand at room temperature 2 hours. DO AHEAD Cover; chill up to 5 days. Bring to room temperature before serving.

  • Serve with aged goat cheese and toasted baguette slices.

Reviews Section

Pasta with Baked Cherry Tomatoes

The deep flavor and delightfully varied textures of this pasta dressing develop in the oven, where you bake the cherry tomatoes coated with bread crumbs just before you toss them with pasta. Roasting them this way intensifies their flavor, and the bread crumbs become crunchy. It is a lovely dish to make when sweet cherry tomatoes are in season, but it is also good with the lesser cherry-tomato varieties you get in winter these can be used successfully here because of the concentration of taste and texture during baking. This dressing is suitable for almost any pasta, but I particularly like it with spaghetti, gemelli, or penne. But because the tomatoes are at their best as soon as they come out of the oven, the dressing and pasta should be cooked simultaneously, and I have written the recipe to ensure that you will have your pasta and baked tomatoes ready for each other at the same time.


Pomodori al Forno - Recipes

• 1 cup (or more) olive oil, divided
• 2 pounds paste tomatoes, halved lengthwise
• 3 teaspoons fresh oregano
• 3/4 teaspoon sugar
• 1/2 teaspoon sea salt
• 1 to 2 garlic cloves, minced
• Plain goat cheese
Crostinis for serving

· Mix olive oil, oregano, sugar and salt in a small bowl.

· Pour 1/2 cup oil mixture into 13x9x2-inch glass or ceramic baking dish. Arrange tomatoes in dish, cut side up. Drizzle with remaining 1/2 cup oil mixture. Bake 1 hour.

Using tongs, turn tomatoes over. Bake 1 hour longer. Turn tomatoes over again. Bake until deep red and very tender, transferring tomatoes to plate when soft (time will vary, depending on ripeness of tomatoes), about 15 to 45 minutes longer.

· You can do the above ahead of time. Be sure to fully cool the tomatoes before covering and placing in the fridge. You can keep them chilled for up to 5 days. Either serve warm or at room temperature.

Take a crostini, put a dollop of plain goat cheese on top and add a dollop of the roasted tomatoes. Yum! I like the goat cheese to also be warm or at room temperature.

· You can also change this recipe up. You could remove the garlic. Or, you could substitute basil for the oregano. Add some fresh parsley on top at the end.


Pomodori al Forno - Oven-roasted Tomatoes with Fresh Herbs

There are never too many ways to enjoy tomatoes, and after making this, I've found another new way to love them. Garlic, lemon and succulent tomato j.

Incredibly tasty, and this fresh tomato recipe couldn't be easier to pull together - your tomato-based side dish could be hearty enough to use as a main dish if you prefer. Considering our team's hefty appetites, we like to pair this with a lovely fresh buffalo-milk mozzarella or a juicy cut of bistecca alla Fiorentina, the infamous Florentine t-steak - an incredible meal to celebrate special moments or just casual every-day meals. If you're not up to making a whole grilled T-bone steak, try pairing these tomatoes with Mamablip's Rolled Veal with Ham and Cheese, or a tasty Veal Saltimbocca entrèe. Don't overlook the fish option: have you thought about the perfect pairing that are roasted tomatoes and Creamed Cod with Polenta?

But be sure you share the love with your family and friends - meals like this are perfect for sharing and caring together.

We adore this super-quick way tomato recipe that brings out the best of our beloved tomatoes, and we're sure you'll also find them incredibly tasty prepared following this method.


Food swaps and the best open-faced sandwich of all time

A fun, informal setting. A party with fellow foodies, lovely people from your own community who want to share their knowledge, their recipes, their food, their lives — with you. You walk away (if you’re like me, you’re skipping and dancing happily), with delicious homemade and homegrown food, and you don’t need to have a dollar in your pocket. How, you ask? Food swaps.

They’s springing up all over the place. If you don’t have one in your town, start one. It’s an amazing community event. It encourages sharing, cooking, talking and eating. The ingredients are more likely to be healthful and organic. In addition to the one I started in San Diego, if you’re in California, I know of swaps in the East Bay, San Francisco, Los Angeles, San Fernando Valley, Santa Monica, Ventura County, in Colorado there are swaps in Denver, Pike’s Peak and Manitau Springs, and others in Seattle, Austin, Dallas, Portland OR, Columbus OH, Brooklyn NY, Queens NY, Albany/Saratoga Springs NY, Minneapolis, Royal Oak MI, Ann Arbor MI, Boston, Trenton IL, Fort Lauderdale FL, Coventry CT, and even in London.

I first heard about food swaps from Kate Payne’s blog, and I was surprised they didn’t have one in a food-centric town like San Diego, so I organized one myself. The first two events were sparsely attended, but an article in the local newspaper packed the lists for our third get-together, and my score from the July 16 San Diego Food Swap was stellar.

Fresh-baked bread. Homemade ice cream in three flavors. Homemade and authentic empenadas. Salsa, pickled onions, cochinita pibil (spicy pulled pork slow-cooked in banana leaves). Pomodori al forno (fresh tomatoes and basil in olive oil, to be served on crusty bread with a nice goat cheese), habanero pepper jelly, and zucchini chutney. Homegrown and organic zucchini squash, kale, swiss chard and radishes. Homemade lemon bars and coconut macaroons. Caramel corn and lavender cookies. Fresh, soft pretzels. My contribution to the party was granola, spicy pickled carrots, carmelized onion chutney and cherry/orange/vanilla jam.

The delicious possibilities are endless. The first was made right on the spot … some fresh, hot, crusty bread, with some salsa, cochinita pibil, and a couple of pickled onions. Greatest open-faced sandwich of all time. Deal with it.

La Familia Aguilar’s Cochinita Pibil

My dear friend Belinda’s dad made these for a birthday party a couple of years ago, and I have been bugging her ever since to make them again. It is a time-consuming process, but totally worth it!

  • 15 lbs of pork, cut into large chunks ( it is recommended you get bone-in pork and cook the bones with the meat for added flavor)
  • 2 cups freshly squeezed orange juice
  • 1 cup freshly squeezed lemon or lime juice
  • 1 cup white vinegar
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • 1 head of garlic
  • 6 bay leaves
  • 2 tbsp. oregano
  • 2 habenero chiles
  • 1 packet of banana leaves *
  • 1 tbsp achiotte seasoning *

(*The banana leaves and achiotte seasoning are available at your local hispanic foods market.) Blend together in a food processor the garlic, chiles, juices, vinegar, achiotte, oregano and salt and pepper, and pour over the chunks of pork in a large bowl. Cover and let it marinate for 2-4 hours. Add the bay leaves. Line a large baking pan with banana leaves, laid horizontally and vertically, and add the pork mixture (including the bones), tucking the leaves over the pork (this was described to me as “like you’re tucking a piggy baby into bed,” haha) and bake at 350 degrees for 4-6 hours. Feel free to periodically check for moisture and spiciness and it may be necessary to add another cup of orange juice (and possibly more spices if you like) at about the third hour of cooking. When it’s ready, you will know because your entire home will smell like mouth-watering pork and the meat will be tender enough to shred with a fork. Remove the bones and serve warm. This freezes beautifully if you have any left over.

Pickled Onions

These are a perfect compliment to the cochinita pibil.

  • 1 whole red onions, sliced into rings
  • 1 cup vinegar (any kind)
  • 1 cup water
  • Pinch of oregano
  • Salt and pepper to taste

Simmer gently in a medium pot until onions are soft. Serve immediately or put into hot jars and seal in a pressure canner.

But there’s more. Ever since I saw the RSVP for the food swap when a participant signed up with “pomodori al forno” and I had to look it up, I was dying to try it. I am normally not a huge fan of fresh tomatoes — I love them cooked, in sauces and whatnot, but I prefer to leave them off of a sandwich or a salad — but these were delicious and juicy and bursting with all of the flavors of fresh herbs and olive oil. Then at the actual swap, a stranger came walking by with fresh (and huge!) zucchini squashes. We were all out on the lawn, under a big shady tree, and we were chatting, laughing, and generally enjoying ourselves when this gentleman was clearly jealous and wanted in on the fun. Score!

I decided to use the zucchini and the pomodori al forno together, with some spicy italian sausage, fresh basil, goat cheese, panko bread crumbs, sauteed with onion, bell pepper and mushroom and then baked at high heat in the oven.

Food Swap Vegetable Casserole

Most, if not all, of these ingredients can be substituted for other ingredients depending on your tastes. This was just my creation based on the fresh vegetables I got at the swap, including the pomodori al forno, which was made by someone else. Essentially pomodori al forno is ripe, sliced tomato cooked in the oven on high heat with good olive oil, fresh basil and various spices. This jar of pomodori al forno was definitely made with love.

  • 1 large zucchini squash, chopped
  • 1 jar of pomodori al forno
  • 2 links of italian sausage
  • 1 bell pepper, chopped
  • 1 large onion
  • 1 cup sliced mushrooms
  • 1 cup panko breadcrumbs
  • 2 tablespoons sugar, 1 tablespoon nutmeg*
  • 4-6 ounces of your favorite goat cheese or other creamy cheese
  • Extra-virgin olive oil
  • Salt and pepper to taste

Preheat your oven to 400 degrees. Place the sausages in a large pot and add water until the sausages are covered sprinkle olive oil on top. Cook on high, turning occasionally, until water evaporates and sausage is cooked and slightly browned. Remove sausage from pot, add chopped zucchini, onion, bell pepper and mushroom. Cut the sausage into chunks and add to pot, season everything with salt and pepper. (*Often, homegrown squash and zucchini, particularly the larger ones, can be very bitter. Taste a piece of the squash when it starts to soften and if you find it is too bitter, sprinkle a small amount of sugar and/ or ground nutmeg to balance out the bitterness of the huge gourds.) Remove from heat when vegetables are soft. Mix in the goat cheese and panko crumbs, and transfer to baking dish. Layer the pomodori al forno tomato slices on top (and sprinkle the herb-y olive oil from the jar on top of the casserole). Delicious!


Baked Snapper with Tomatoes and Olives (Pesce al Forno con Pomodori e Olive Neri)

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This versatile recipe for baking fish calls for snapper, but you can use any other tender, flaky fish like bass, sole, or bream. Once you get comfortable with the baking method, try using different herbs, olives, and spices like ground coriander or even a touch of cumin.

What to buy:
Pitted niçoise olives are available at specialty food stores and are worth the hunt. Unpitted will work as well—just remember to tell your guests! Serve with roasted summer squash.

Special equipment:
I don’t recommend using aluminum baking pans, since the wine and tomatoes will react unfavorably and become bitter. Glazed ceramic, stainless steel, enameled cast iron, and Spanish cazuelas offer the best heat. Ovenproof glass will work, too.

Game plan: You can bake the fish till about 3/4 done and hold it for up to an hour before serving. Drape plastic wrap over the fish to keep it moist. To serve, remove the plastic, spoon some of the pan juices over the fish, then finish in the oven. By the time you start to hear the ingredients in the baking dish sizzle, the fish will be ready. Continue as directed. To hold the tomatoes, coat them with a little olive oil and do not season until ready to add to the fish. Adding salt too soon will pull water from the tomatoes and make the finished dish too watery.


Notes about this recipe

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Where’s the full recipe - why can I only see the ingredients?

At Eat Your Books we love great recipes – and the best come from chefs, authors and bloggers who have spent time developing and testing them.

We’ve helped you locate this recipe but for the full instructions you need to go to its original source.

If the recipe is available online - click the link “View complete recipe”– if not, you do need to own the cookbook or magazine.


Core the tomatoes and cut them in half lengthwise. Gently squeeze out some of the juice and pulp. (Reserve for another use such as stock, or discard.) Trim a small piece off the bottom of each tomato so it will sit without tilting. Place the cut halves in a buttered baking dish large enough to hold them in a single layer. Set aside.

In a bowl, combine the broccoli and cheese. Set aside.

In a frying pan, heat the olive oil. Add the garlic and sauté until soft. Stir in the anchovy paste, add the bread crumbs, and mix well. Add the bread crumb mixture to the broccoli and cheese. Add the parsley and pepper and mix well.

Divide the broccoli mixture evenly among the tomato halves. Bake the tomatoes until the cheese is bubbly and the crumbs are beginning to brown, about 25 minutes. Serve immediately.


Puglia and orecchiette pasta.

This recipe for orecchiette pasta with roasted tomatoes comes from Bari in Puglia and is sometimes also called ‘alla Barese’. However, there are a number of other pasta recipes from Puglia or different versions of pasta with roasted tomatoes also called ‘alla Barese’. Like this recipe for a pasta salad.

Since orecchiette are quintessentially Apulian, they are the perfect pasta partner for this sauce. This time round, we actually made the orecchiette ourselves! However, you can use dried or ready made fresh orecchiette or other pasta like penne. Even long pasta would work if you prefer.


Notes about this recipe

Member Rating

Categories

Where’s the full recipe - why can I only see the ingredients?

At Eat Your Books we love great recipes – and the best come from chefs, authors and bloggers who have spent time developing and testing them.

We’ve helped you locate this recipe but for the full instructions you need to go to its original source.

If the recipe is available online - click the link “View complete recipe”– if not, you do need to own the cookbook or magazine.


Watch the video: Сицилийская вкуснятина. Паста аль форно.